new-york

Laurent Millet

Robert Mann Gallery

The title of Laurent Millet’s fourth solo exhibition at this gallery, “The Last Days of Immanuel Kant,” may have led some viewers to anticipate a po-faced Conceptual deconstruction of the Critique of Judgment, but the French artist’s photographs are surprisingly light and playful affairs, requiring little if any knowledge of eighteenth-century epistemology. In fact, the show’s moniker is borrowed from a novella by Thomas De Quincey that traces the tail end of the eminent philosopher’s life through the gradual waning of his once-acute senses. Millet’s shots of his own sculptural tableaux mirror the premise of the book insofar as, by exploiting quirks of light, focus, and perspective, they cast doubt on the reliability of perception.

That said, Millet’s images are never fully illusionistic but rather hint at the gaps in our understanding of the visual world through the judicious use of color

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