new-york

Jacques Lipchitz, Theseus and the Minotaur, 1942, bronze, 24 1/2 x 28 1/2 x 16".

Jacques Lipchitz

Marlborough Gallery | New York

Jacques Lipchitz, Theseus and the Minotaur, 1942, bronze, 24 1/2 x 28 1/2 x 16".

“Jacques Lipchitz’s sculpture before 1914 was banal,” Douglas Cooper writes, and “the late-baroque style he [cultivated after] 1928 has led to works which are more vigorous than artistically meaningful.” For Cooper, curator of the seminal 1970–71 exhibition “The Cubist Epoch,” Lipchitz produced important sculpture only in the short period between those dates, when, under the influence of Juan Gris and Henri Laurens, his works embodied the narrow category of Synthetic Cubism. This exhibition at Marlborough—which was curated by Kosme de Baraño, former Executive Director of the Instituto Valenciano de Arte Moderno, and which included roughly fifty sculptures made between 1911 and 1972, some small studies, some human-size—brought Cooper’s judgment into question. It did so in part by suggesting the aesthetic limitations of the works he praised, and in part by revealing that

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