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Yazid Oulab, Échafaudage (Scaffolding), 2009, rope and resin, approx. 118 1/8 x 61 3/8 x 20 7/8".

Yazid Oulab

Galerie Eric Dupont

Yazid Oulab, Échafaudage (Scaffolding), 2009, rope and resin, approx. 118 1/8 x 61 3/8 x 20 7/8".

Sufism—Muslim mysticism—serves as a sort of philosophical base for Yazid Oulab’s fragile sculptures, often made of everyday objects and materials that the Algerian-born, Marseille, France–based artist endows with new significance. In his latest solo exhibition, he continued to allude to that esoteric strain of religion—or rather spirituality—that he perceives as an important part of the peaceful, meditative essence of his native Algerian culture, and to its use of lyrical chanting as an invocative activity. A long-standing fascination with the poetic language of the mythological texts of North Africa and the Middle East recently led the artist to the ancient Egyptian ceremony known as the judgment of Osiris. As recorded in the Book of the Dead, written to guide the souls of the deceased to the afterlife, the heart of the deceased was weighed on a scale. Responding

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