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Carl Andre, Chinati Thirteener, 2010, hot-rolled steel, thirteen rows of ten parts, each 1/4 x 12 x 36". Installation view, Chinati Foundation, Marfa, TX.

Carl Andre

Carl Andre, Chinati Thirteener, 2010, hot-rolled steel, thirteen rows of ten parts, each 1/4 x 12 x 36". Installation view, Chinati Foundation, Marfa, TX.

WE NEVER STOP RELEARNING the significance of certain bodies of work. A remarkable installation on view at the Chinati Foundation demonstrates—or, better, reminds us—how Carl Andre can collapse the distance between almost-nothing and almost-everything.

Installation is intrinsic to the subliminal power of Andre’s sculpture—to the way we not only examine the work but physically engage it—and “Cuts into Space: Sculptures by Carl Andre” (organized by Marianne Stockebrand, until recently the director of Chinati) has been installed with perfect tact. Five works occupy the venue (a converted army barracks, in the form of a rectilinear U, devoted to temporary exhibitions): three installations indoors; one work outside, Chinati Thirteener, 2010, consisting of thirteen rows, each composed of ten steel plates; and a found-object sculpture of 1963 (The Sign of Immortality,

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