san-francisco

View of “Gary Simmons, 2010. Foreground: Greetings and Salutations, 2010. Background: Credit Roll, 2010.

Gary Simmons

Anthony Meier Fine Arts

View of “Gary Simmons, 2010. Foreground: Greetings and Salutations, 2010. Background: Credit Roll, 2010.

The so-called blaxploitation film genre courted controversy during its meteoric rise (and equally precipitous disappearance) in the 1970s. Marketed specifically to black audiences and defined by unprecedented depictions of black heroes fighting a villainous white establishment, these films were, on the one hand, hailed for offering revolutionary representations of black power, and, on the other, condemned for perpetuating racial stereotypes and glamorizing violence, drugs, and extramarital sex. Though Gary Simmons made no attempt to resolve the paradoxes of blaxploitation in his exhibition “Black Marquee,” the show offered an engaging reflection on the pleasures, limitations, and transgressions of the genre in light of the institutional conditions and representational possibilities of commercial cinema—both then and now.

The show comprised two pieces. For Credit Roll, 2010,

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