new-york

View of “Gedi Sibony,” 2010. Foreground: The Cutters, 2007/2010. Background: From Center, 2010.

Gedi Sibony

Greene Naftali Gallery

View of “Gedi Sibony,” 2010. Foreground: The Cutters, 2007/2010. Background: From Center, 2010.

Scraps of carpet, cardboard, plywood, and the occasional swath of fabric: We’ve come to associate such materials with Gedi Sibony’s art. For nearly a decade, run-of-the-mill cast-offs have played prominent roles in his parsimonious, barely there sculptures. Sibony’s meticulous engagement with the scavenged object, his reverence for the mundane, has developed into a highly identifiable aesthetic and has seemingly been an influence on a host of emerging artists worldwide. In recent years, we’ve seen a proliferation of Sibonyesque works, with at-hand materials deployed in ways that appear overwrought and yet light as a feather, specific and vague, contemplative and humdrum, timeless and recessional. In a word: elusive. To be sure, Sibony’s sphinxlike works ever resist categorization. Perhaps that’s why they’ve been so appealing.

The artist’s second exhibition at Greene Naftali

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