frankfurt

Guillermo Faivovich & Nicolás Goldberg, El Taco, 2010, iron and nickel, two halves, each approx. 23 5/8 x 51 x 63".

Guillermo Faivovich & Nicolás Goldberg

Portikus

Guillermo Faivovich & Nicolás Goldberg, El Taco, 2010, iron and nickel, two halves, each approx. 23 5/8 x 51 x 63".

Entering the Portikus exhibition hall, you walked directly toward a solitary dark boulder, split in half down the middle. The boulder is about a yard across, knee-high, and jagged as a nugget of lava. But the split edge is smooth and perfect. Its precision distinctly shows that this cut was carried out deliberately, with carefully calibrated instruments. And while one half looks rusty and a bit weathered, as though it had been outdoors a long time, the other has a metallic sheen; it seems to have been sheltered from the elements.

Though this boulder, which constituted the entirety of the show “Meteorit ‘El Taco,” is the work of Guillermo Faivovich and Nicolás Goldberg, the Argentine artists did not sculpt the stone themselves. On the contrary: They brought back together—insofar as possible—the two parts of a meteorite, known as El Taco, that scientists had sliced apart.

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the February 2011 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.