los-angeles

Naotaka Hiro, Night and Fog, Tubes on Black Mountain, 2010, still from a digital video, 22 minutes.

Koki Tanaka and Naotaka Hiro

Las Cienegas Projects

Naotaka Hiro, Night and Fog, Tubes on Black Mountain, 2010, still from a digital video, 22 minutes.

Perhaps the single most striking aspect of Koki Tanaka and Naotaka Hiro’s dizzying two-person exhibition was the choreographed sound that swept through the gallery in a protracted clatter: noises that evoked the prepping and chopping of fish, lights switched on and off, dishes broken, rhythmic drumming, repetitive chiming. This percussive orchestration arose from the show’s seven video installations (five by Tanaka and two by Hiro, both projected and screened on monitors) and served as white noise, the hypnotic power of which pulled the viewer into the action of each. The accord between these two bodies of work may be partially attributed to the fact that both artists are LA-based, Japanese-born, and roughly the same age. However, with Hiro denaturing the normative relationship we have with our own bodies and their sensorial coordinates, and Tanaka partaking in a kind of alchemy

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