paris

Marlie Mul, Me (Connected) (detail), 2010, wood, varnish, ink, plastic tubing, approx. 12' 1 5/8“ x 3' 9 1/4”.

Marlie Mul

Galerie Lucile Corty

Marlie Mul, Me (Connected) (detail), 2010, wood, varnish, ink, plastic tubing, approx. 12' 1 5/8“ x 3' 9 1/4”.

Marlie Mul’s exhibition “Your Wet Sleeve in My Neck” had something green and full of potential about it. In the gallery’s street-level space was a low-lying sculpture diagonally laid out in serpentine form. This piece had the smack of an extravagantly long wind instrument or hookah pipe, but in fact it had no passage for air. It consisted of lightly polished, solid-wood spindles set on the floor, joined end to end with straight or bent segments of clear PVC tubing. Each rod had a lathe-turned design for what would appear to be anachronistic stair balusters—twisted spirals, orbs, tapered ends and all—and was marbled like the endpapers of an antiquarian book—that is, they were dipped in a bath laced with marbling inks. A jealously guarded trade secret in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, marbling is today a quaint but widespread hobby. The finish is applied to

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the February 2011 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.