New York

Heinz Mack, Lamellen Relief, 1967–68, aluminum, Plexiglas, wood, stainless steel, 48 1/2 x 40 3/8 x 3 1/2".

Heinz Mack, Lamellen Relief, 1967–68, aluminum, Plexiglas, wood, stainless steel, 48 1/2 x 40 3/8 x 3 1/2".

Heinz Mack

Sperone Westwater

Heinz Mack, Lamellen Relief, 1967–68, aluminum, Plexiglas, wood, stainless steel, 48 1/2 x 40 3/8 x 3 1/2".

In 1958, in Düsseldorf, Heinz Mack and Otto Piene formed the group Zero, publishing a journal by the same name and staging one-night exhibitions in Piene’s studio. Expanding in 1961 to include Günther Uecker, who with Mack and Piene formed the core of the undertaking, Zero came to be associated with myriad international groups, such as Gutaï in Japan and Nove Tendencije in Yugoslavia. Yves Klein, working in the Rhineland at the time, was briefly affiliated with them.

Important to Zero’s eclectic output was a consideration of natural phenomena; the group imagined a kind of sculpture that would, in the words of Piene, “harmonize the relationship between man and nature—nature [which] offers enormous impulses, from the elements: the sky, the sea, the Arctic, the desert, air, light, water, fire.” Mack, in particular, was interested in sculpture that conveyed light’s immaterial

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