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Kim Adams, Love Birds (detail), 1998–2010, Ford Econoline cargo vans, car parts, grain-silo caps, perforated water barrels, lighting and trailer systems, 11' 4“ x 8' x 8' and 11' 2” x 11' x 11'.

Kim Adams

Diaz Contemporary

Kim Adams, Love Birds (detail), 1998–2010, Ford Econoline cargo vans, car parts, grain-silo caps, perforated water barrels, lighting and trailer systems, 11' 4“ x 8' x 8' and 11' 2” x 11' x 11'.

Since the late 1970s, Edmonton, Canada–born artist Kim Adams has been repurposing salvaged auto parts, hobby kits, and hardware varia to create hybrid vehicularesque sculptures. While many works are life-scale, appearing quasi-habitable—like Andrea Zittel’s Travel Trailers—just as many are toy-size, installed on shelves as though goods in a shop. At Diaz Contemporary, Adams showed a mix of ten works produced over the last decade, including large-scale structures based on two small-scale models that he made in the 1980s. While the artist has received a good deal of exposure over the past three decades, particularly in Canada, it was interesting to envision this show as taking stock of how, as we sober up from our participatory binge of the aughts, Adams’s work reads now, particularly as an exemplary form of process-based practice.

Perhaps the obvious point of entry would

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