dublin

Declan Clarke, We’ll Be This Way Until the End of the World, 2008, color film in 16 mm transferred to video, 4 minutes 5 seconds. Installation view.

Declan Clarke

mother's tankstation | Dublin

Declan Clarke, We’ll Be This Way Until the End of the World, 2008, color film in 16 mm transferred to video, 4 minutes 5 seconds. Installation view.

We’ll Be This Way Until the End of the World, 2008, the eponymous work of Declan Clarke’s recent show, is a 16-mm film (transferred to DVD) that features details of a monument dedicated to Daniel O’Connell, an Irish political leader and celebrated orator active in the first half of the nineteenth century. Unveiled to the public in 1882, and located on the Dublin street now named after O’Connell, the sculpture incorporates four winged female figures representing the virtues of courage, fidelity, patriotism, and eloquence. Projected onto a large freestanding screen, Clarke’s film consists entirely of elegantly composed details of the faces and upper bodies of two winged figures, each marked by a bullet hole. There is no indication of the surroundings, and the only movement is provided by a bird passing across the gray sky above. These bullet holes date from the Easter Rising of

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the April 2011 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.