naples

Marisa Albanese, Partiture per mani sole (Score for Hands Only), 2005, still from a three-channel black-and-white video installation, 3 minutes 20 seconds.

Marisa Albanese

Museo Nazionale di Capodimonte

Marisa Albanese, Partiture per mani sole (Score for Hands Only), 2005, still from a three-channel black-and-white video installation, 3 minutes 20 seconds.

Naples stands in the shadow of a time bomb, Mount Vesuvius, and the chaotic, colorful city itself is a memento mori. Marisa Albanese’s double exhibition, “Spyholes” and “Grand Tour 2.0,” was a meditation on the passing of time at different scales through the strange wormhole of personal experience under the volcano, a potent symbol of mortality.

“Spyholes” was introduced by Partiture per mani sole (Score for Hands Only), 2005, three small videos, each framed in a hardback book, that chart blurry spatial paths as pairs of hands move in time to unheard musical compositions. A metronome clicking independently on the floor below might represent geologic time advancing ceaselessly while the fragile human hand creates its own oblivious melody. In the next room “V.104,” 2003–2004, a series of photographs piled into sculptural stacks, tracks the periodic disappearance and reappearance of

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