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Odani Motohiko, Dying Slave: Stella, 2009–10, steel, paraffin, wax, 5' 10 7/8“ x 16' 5” x 7' 2 5/8".

Odani Motohiko

Mori Art Museum

Odani Motohiko, Dying Slave: Stella, 2009–10, steel, paraffin, wax, 5' 10 7/8“ x 16' 5” x 7' 2 5/8".

Only in his late thirties, Odani Motohiko is already receiving star treatment, as confirmed once again by his exhibition at the Mori Art Museum, comprising some sixty works created since 1997. Having come of age in what he calls the transitional period—that is, between the eras dominated by analog and digital media—Odani shows his dexterity in modes ranging from traditional crafts and wooden sculptures to multimedia installation. His styles are as various as his references, which range from Michelangelo to horror movies and modern Japanese sculpture. Accordingly, this expansive selection of works was fashionably schizophrenic, as if in an effort to resist being defined through a signature style.

Unfortunately, Odani’s earlier works not only tend to be more concise than his recent ones but are generally of higher quality. The most thought-provoking of the latter include

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