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Bridget Riley, Arcadia 3, 2009/2011, graphite and acrylic on wall, 5' 7 3/4“ x 12' 3”.

Bridget Riley

Galerie Max Hetzler | Oudenarder Strasse

Bridget Riley, Arcadia 3, 2009/2011, graphite and acrylic on wall, 5' 7 3/4“ x 12' 3”.

If you want to know what interests inform Bridget Riley’s work, you could study her modernist predecessors: Mondrian, perhaps, or Seurat. But it would be at least as illuminating to go on a nature walk with your eyes wide open. Implicit in Riley’s paintings is an intimate knowledge of the workings of nature and how things are perceived by the human eye. No matter that her work is abstract and never depicts landscapes. Just as nature reinvents itself minute to minute under the influence of light, rain, and wind, Bridget Riley’s paintings keep changing under your gaze.

Riley’s exhibition was announced as a mini-retrospective, though mini is relative: The twenty-one works comfortably filled the space of the former factory that houses Galerie Max Hetzler. They date from the period 1983–2010; this is the later Riley, no longer wedded to the Op art with which she made her name in the

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