saint-louis

Thea Djordjadze, His Vanity Requires No Response, 2011, mixed media. Installation view.

Thea Djordjadze and George Maciunas

Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis

Thea Djordjadze, His Vanity Requires No Response, 2011, mixed media. Installation view.

In 2008, the Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis launched its Front Room, a modestly sized gallery space off the entrance lobby, in which guest curators organize experimental, short-run shows. This March, an unlikely pairing of works by the late, Lithuanian-born Fluxus artist George Maciunas (works selected by Mari Dumett) and Georgian, Berlin-based artist Thea Djordjadze (curated by Mel Trad) produced some unexpected revelations, and even a few formal parallels that encouraged us to read process-based narratives into Djordjadze’s often opaque installations, while synthesizing the odds and ends associated with Maciunas’s projects to be seen as more than just ephemera.

Designer, architect, and a founding member of Fluxus, George Maciunas (1931–1978) was represented here by works such as Artist Name Cards, ca. 1964–68, and a chart titled Fluxus, Its Historical Development and Relationship

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