new-york

Victoria Sambunaris, Untitled (Farm with workers, Jacumba, CA), 2010, color photograph, 39 x 55". From the series “The Border,” 2009–.

Victoria Sambunaris

Yancey Richardson Gallery

Victoria Sambunaris, Untitled (Farm with workers, Jacumba, CA), 2010, color photograph, 39 x 55". From the series “The Border,” 2009–.

The border between the United States and Mexico has been contested since 1848, when the signing of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo ended war between the countries. It took survey teams six years just to draw the line, then marked with small obelisks and stone mounds. Disputes arising from population growth and other forms of development necessitated that this survey work be redone in the 1890s, when more than two hundred additional monuments were erected. During the twentieth century, as towns and cities along the border grew, five hundred more markers were dedicated; in recent decades, they have been connected by fences, owing to fears of illegal border crossings. Throughout this history, images have played an important role in the recognition and policing of this boundary, from Arthur Schott’s ink drawings, created for the initial surveys, to contemporary video surveillance

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