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View of “William E. Jones,” 2011. From left: Berlin Flash Frames, 2010; In Mathew Brady’s Studio, 2010.

William E. Jones

David Kordansky Gallery

View of “William E. Jones,” 2011. From left: Berlin Flash Frames, 2010; In Mathew Brady’s Studio, 2010.

Three time-based works dominated William E. Jones’s third solo show at David Kordansky Gallery. Projected floor-to-ceiling on three contiguous walls, In Mathew Brady’s Studio, Berlin Flash Frames, and Spatial Disorientation—silent works (all 2010) that employ, respectively, zooms, flash frames, and aerial photography—felt aggressive, at times even dizzying in total. (Loosely recalling the enticing dare of Tony Conrad’s disclaimer at the outset of The Flicker, 1966, there was even a warning posted on Kordansky’s gallery door cautioning viewers about the potentially dangerous physiological results of subjecting oneself to the stroboscopic images within.)

Curiously, each of Jones’s works was described not as a film or video, but rather as a “sequence of digital files.” This phrasing explicitly suggests the complex technological materiality of these constructions—particularly

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