los-angeles

Robert Heinecken, PP Estée Lauder, 1998, dye-bleach print from photogram, 14 x 11". Marc Selwyn Fine Art.

Robert Heinecken

Marc Selwyn Fine Art

Robert Heinecken, PP Estée Lauder, 1998, dye-bleach print from photogram, 14 x 11". Marc Selwyn Fine Art.

Employing sophisticated strategies of appropriation and montage, Robert Heinecken (1931–2006) developed a practice that anticipated the exploration of identity and mass media subsequently taken up by many younger artists, in particular, those associated with the Pictures generation. This spring, two exhibitions in Los Angeles—at Marc Selwyn Fine Art and Cherry and Martin—afforded a comprehensive overview of the late Californian’s oeuvre.

A contemporary of John Baldessari and Wallace Berman, Heinecken was perhaps best known for his appropriative photograms—works (seen at both galleries) such as the gelatin silver print series “Are You Rea,” 1964–68, and the dye-bleach (or dye “destruction”) print series “Recto/Verso,” 1988–90—in which both faces of a given magazine leaf have been contact-printed onto the same side of a single page. Through their chance juxtapositions,

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