reviews

Boris Mikhailov, Tea Coffee Cappuccino, 2000–10, color photograph, 9 3/4 x 16 1/4". From the series “Tea Coffee Cappuccino,” 2000–10.

Boris Mikhailov

Galerie Barbara Weiss

Boris Mikhailov, Tea Coffee Cappuccino, 2000–10, color photograph, 9 3/4 x 16 1/4". From the series “Tea Coffee Cappuccino,” 2000–10.

For more than four decades, Boris Mikhailov has photographed the shifting visual landscape of his native Ukraine, utilizing a range of formal approaches while never fully abandoning the spontaneous, amateur quality of what initially began as a hobby. (He was fired from an engineering job in the late 1960s, when the KGB discovered nude photographs he’d taken of his wife.) In his recent exhibition at Galerie Barbara Weiss—inaugurating the gallery’s impeccable new venue in Kreuzberg—the artist presented two series of works, “Black Archive,” 1968–79, and “Tea Coffee Cappuccino,” 2000–10, spanning an artistic trajectory devoted to capturing and critiquing a cultural history that might have been otherwise neglected or forgotten.

As in his work from the ’90s, especially “Case Study,” 1997, a series of portraits showing the diseased and scarred bodies of his hometown Kharkov’s

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the September 2011 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.