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Catalina Parra, Diario de Vida (Diary of Life), 1977, El Mercurio newspapers, thread, Plexiglas, metal bolts, metal nuts, 12 x 6 x 16".

Catalina Parra

MINI/Goethe-Institut Curatorial Residencies Ludlow 38

Catalina Parra, Diario de Vida (Diary of Life), 1977, El Mercurio newspapers, thread, Plexiglas, metal bolts, metal nuts, 12 x 6 x 16".

During its exurban heyday of the early 1970s, Land art wasn’t known for political critique. But by the 1980s, artists such as Agnes Denes and Maya Lin were tracing a different trajectory of its co-option of Minimalism’s formal simplicity, understanding that Land art’s monumental scale and extreme geometricization occupied an uneasy relationship to memorialization, histories of territorial dispossession, and the unequal distribution of natural resources among global populations. Like Denes—and also of the same generation as artists such as James Turrell, Robert Smithson, and Walter De Maria—Chilean-born, New York–based artist Catalina Parra adopts a language of abstraction to pointed political effect. In FOSA, 2005, Parra excavated a massive pit the size of a large swimming pool in the Atacama Desert in northern Chile (where Patricio Guzmán’s 2010 film Nostalgia for the

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