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Chris Kraus, How to Shoot a Crime, 1987, still from a Super 8 film transferred to DVD, 28 minutes.

Chris Kraus

Real Fine Arts

Chris Kraus, How to Shoot a Crime, 1987, still from a Super 8 film transferred to DVD, 28 minutes.

Over the past decade, writer and cultural critic Chris Kraus has gone to great lengths to distance herself from her earliest works, a handful of experimental films made between 1981 and 1996. In a recent lecture, she described them by turns as “unwatchable” and “pathetic.” (They are neither.) Her public disdain for her films, as well as her more veiled contempt for them in her novels (including the brilliant, semiautobiographical I Love Dick [1997], narrated by a “failed filmmaker”), might be less an earnest expression of private feelings than a witty ploy to pique our interest, to get the works back into play. In any case, hindsight’s always a bitch. In the spring of 2008 the films were on view at Berlin’s Galerie Cinzia Friedlaender and for a month this past summer they were shown alongside posters, screenplays, and shooting notes at Real Fine Arts in “Chris Kraus: Films.”

Kraus

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