new-york

Diana Shpungin, I Especially Love You When You Are Sleeping, 2011, graphite pencil, citrus tree, citrus leaves, medical tape, newspaper obituaries, 24 x 36 x 68".

Diana Shpungin

Stephan Stoyanov Gallery

Diana Shpungin, I Especially Love You When You Are Sleeping, 2011, graphite pencil, citrus tree, citrus leaves, medical tape, newspaper obituaries, 24 x 36 x 68".

It is perhaps axiomatic that many of the qualities of grief that make it an enticing subject for artistic exploration—the intensity of feeling it provokes, its inextricable ties with memory, the way its specifics are totally intimate yet its contours immediately understandable to all—are precisely those that make it such a problematic one to work with. Harnessing that intensity without squelching it; teasing out the memories in a way that makes them translatable; unpacking the details without feeling a need to wrestle every last one of them into some kind of larger symbol: These are poles that need to be carefully negotiated, but not so carefully that the work loses track of what’s at stake in the emotional terrain of real, tangible loss.

Diana Shpungin, a resourceful, Latvian-born artist who has lived in New York for the past decade, has taken on this challenge in her

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