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Larissa Fassler, Place de la Concorde I, 2011, pen on paper, 54 1/2 x 75 1/2".

Larissa Fassler

September

Larissa Fassler, Place de la Concorde I, 2011, pen on paper, 54 1/2 x 75 1/2".

Produced in the wake of Nicolas Sarkozy’s scandalous move in July 2010 to “clean up” France by closing down Roma camps and orchestrating large-scale deportations, Larissa Fassler’s recent exhibition explored inequities in Parisian life by asking how and how freely individuals may navigate public spaces, and investigating the politics of failed urban planning. Sarkozy’s policy was evidence, even before the mass killings in Norway this summer, that Europe is again burdened with xenophobia-tinged questions of national identity. With drawings and sculptures, Fassler foregrounded perspectives on the French capital that darkened its legend as the City of Light, in the process giving form to narratives that challenge the postcard-ready image officials prefer to promote.

The Berlin-based Canadian artist’s on-site study of the Place de la Concorde provoked the most layered works in the

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