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Lee Ufan, Relatum, 1971/2011, cushions, stones, light. Installation view. Photo: David Heald.

Lee Ufan

Lee Ufan, Relatum, 1971/2011, cushions, stones, light. Installation view. Photo: David Heald.

IT HAS BEEN SOME TWENTY YEARS since the great wave of introductions to modern non-Western art, the peak of which coincided with the popularization of such terms as globalization and transnationalism in the 1990s. Now, with those introductions complete, the project of positioning non-Western modernities in an expanded art history has taken on increasing urgency, yielding a growing number of studies and exhibitions bent on historicizing such art. “Lee Ufan: Marking Infinity” was an intriguing case in point. The first US retrospective for Lee, the Korean-born artist whose writings, paintings, and sculptures helped define the parameters of how contemporary art would be discussed in both Japan and Korea during the 1960s and ’70s, the exhibition covered nearly the entirety of the artist’s fifty-year career, from his days as a young philosophy student in Tokyo to his present status as

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