new-york

Richard Tuttle, System 2, Winter, 2011, 2 x 4“ fir lumber, 4 x 4” fir lumber, acrylic, asphaltum, balsa wood, beet juice, bolts, bubble wrap, cotton string, enamel, fabrics, feathers, fir plywood, galvanized metal, glass beads, leather, metal, pine, vinyl-coated steel cable, powder-coated iron, straight pins, Styrofoam, wing nuts, wire, 96 x 96 x 96".

Richard Tuttle

The Pace Gallery | 508 W 25th Street

Richard Tuttle, System 2, Winter, 2011, 2 x 4“ fir lumber, 4 x 4” fir lumber, acrylic, asphaltum, balsa wood, beet juice, bolts, bubble wrap, cotton string, enamel, fabrics, feathers, fir plywood, galvanized metal, glass beads, leather, metal, pine, vinyl-coated steel cable, powder-coated iron, straight pins, Styrofoam, wing nuts, wire, 96 x 96 x 96".

“What’s the Wind” was a little startling coming from Richard Tuttle, an artist famous for artmaking delicate enough to spark the story that people have walked in and out of a roomful of his work believing the space was empty. The critic Robert Storr once titled an essay on Tuttle “Touching Down Lightly”; in this show, the artist touched down pretty heavily, making six large, awkward conglomerations of bright-colored, often scrappy-looking components, all set solidly on the floor, all around eight or nine feet square, the tallest reaching to sixteen feet high. Tuttle is actually quite comfortable with scale, having made fairly sizable works, some of them robust enough to be installed outdoors. In fact, even his most fragile and insubstantial pieces may activate entire spaces. Still, in seeming to move in the direction of an artist like Jessica Stockholder, the works in “What’s the

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