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Šejla Kamerić, Glück (Happiness), 2010, still from a 16-mm film transferred to HD video, 18 minutes 25 seconds.

Šejla Kamerić

GALERIE TANJA WAGNER

Šejla Kamerić, Glück (Happiness), 2010, still from a 16-mm film transferred to HD video, 18 minutes 25 seconds.

In Šejla Kamerić’s film Glück (Happiness), 2010, a city of the past mingles with a city of the present. The city is Berlin. Its streets are empty, its shutters closed: One might think of East Berlin in the days of the Wall, or soon after. A young woman enters the scene, towing a shopping cart behind her. She has gone out to the pump for water and is wheeling it home in jerricans. It would be a peculiar sight in the city today: a well-dressed woman, out fetching water. And it gives no clue as to why the film should be called Glück.

Galerie Tanja Wagner screened Kamerić’s film in the ballroom of the nineteenth-century Villa Elisabeth, an ingenious choice. The very act of walking into the space was an engagement with the theme of the film: the interaction of memory and imagination, the way a memory can stand in the way of awareness but can also set things in motion and forge a connection

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