new-york

Lyonel Feininger, In a Village Near Paris (Street in Paris, Pink Sky), 1909, oil on canvas, 39 3/4 x 32".

Lyonel Feininger

Whitney Museum of American Art

Lyonel Feininger, In a Village Near Paris (Street in Paris, Pink Sky), 1909, oil on canvas, 39 3/4 x 32".

Having lived and worked in Germany for more than half his life, Lyonel Feininger (1871–1956) was something of an unlikely American. This exhibtion—his first major retrospective in the United States in forty-five years—makes a strong case for the importance of his work to the stateside avant-garde, albeit filtered indirectly back across the Atlantic before the artist’s own, eventual return to his native New York. Born to a German father and an American mother, Feininger moved to Berlin as a young man after a sojourn in Hamburg. He returned to the States only in 1937, by which time Hitler’s government had rendered the avant-garde a political liability, displaying Feininger’s canvases in its infamous parade of “Degenerate” horrors. By then, the artist’s career had unfolded in sync with some of the century’s most consequential aesthetic tendencies: from the Secessionist set

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