milan-rome

Rosalind Nashashibi, Carlo’s Vision, 2011, still from a color film in 16 mm, 11 minutes.

Rosalind Nashashibi

Peep-Hole/Nomas Foundation

Rosalind Nashashibi, Carlo’s Vision, 2011, still from a color film in 16 mm, 11 minutes.

Rosalind Nashashibi showed her new 16-mm film, Carlo’s Vision, 2011, at spaces in both Milan and Rome. The dual venue signified not only a coproduction but also an amplification of the effect of a work that, in just eleven minutes, conveys a simultaneously lyrical and crude cross-section of a profoundly troubled country. The film was inspired by an episode in Petrolio (Oil), Pier Paolo Pasolini’s fragmentary and cryptic unfinished last novel, which was published posthumously in 1992. Petrolio made a crucial contribution to our understanding of events that occurred in Italy in the 1960s and ’70s, but, as Nashashibi makes clear, Pasolini accomplished much more. What the artist captures about Pasolini is his foresight, and she updates certain passages from the novel that anticipate the degree to which the exercise of power—manifested in the sexualization of society on the one

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