seoul

Seo Hae-geun, F-15K, 2011, pencil, paper, wire, and glue, 32' 10“ x 19' 8” x 7' 6".

Seo Hae-geun

SHINHAN MUSEUM

Seo Hae-geun, F-15K, 2011, pencil, paper, wire, and glue, 32' 10“ x 19' 8” x 7' 6".

When Anselm Kiefer made his lead airplanes twenty years ago, they were laden, as were all of his creations, with metaphors of war, violence, history, and, ultimately, death. Distantly resembling the planes used in World War II air battles, Kiefer’s earthbound aircraft with a polyhedron on one wing (Melancholia, 1990–91) or with gigantic books made of lead sheets on both (Angel of History, 1989) eloquently insinuated the unbearable weight of a ruinous history and a reflection on the unending process of mourning. If Kiefer’s monumental installations were an effective prescription for those viewers yearning for dramatic and grandiose spectacles paired with readily decipherable symbols amid the return to figuration of the 1980s, Seo Hae-geun’s F-15K (all works 2011)—a multirole combat aircraft also known as the Slam Eagles, made of paper and glue and a little wire—is the

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