reviews

Jeppe Hein, Spiral Labyrinth I, 2006, polished mirror plate, aluminum panel, metal frame. Installation view, Artplay Design Center. From “Rewriting Worlds.”

the 4th Moscow Biennial

Jeppe Hein, Spiral Labyrinth I, 2006, polished mirror plate, aluminum panel, metal frame. Installation view, Artplay Design Center. From “Rewriting Worlds.”

SOME BIENNIALS, such as those in São Paulo, Berlin, and Istanbul, have at least one permanent venue. This usually means the country in question gives contemporary art and the critical thinking that goes with it (or so we like to believe) some kind of legitimate status, regardless of whether the physical space allotted to it is an embarrassingly corporate exhibition hall, a traditional museum, or a former warehouse. Other biennials are constantly searching for a space, physical as well as intellectual. The sites such biennials come to occupy are often places where the wounds of change are most evident: areas that are abandoned and forgotten, buildings that await sale, or a neighborhood where developers are eager for artists to enhance its reputation and encourage the flow of capital. The Moscow Biennale falls into the second category. It changes its location constantly, sometimes

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