reviews

View of Printemps de Septembre, Musée les Abbattoirs, Toulouse. Walls, from left: Josh Smith, Untitled (Toulouse I), 2011; Pablo Picasso, La Dépouille du Minotaure en costume d’arlequin (The Remains of the Minotaur in Harlequin Costume), 1936; Josh Smith, Untitled (Toulouse II), 2011. Floor: Ei Arakawa, See Weeds, 2011.

Printemps de Septembre

View of Printemps de Septembre, Musée les Abbattoirs, Toulouse. Walls, from left: Josh Smith, Untitled (Toulouse I), 2011; Pablo Picasso, La Dépouille du Minotaure en costume d’arlequin (The Remains of the Minotaur in Harlequin Costume), 1936; Josh Smith, Untitled (Toulouse II), 2011. Floor: Ei Arakawa, See Weeds, 2011.

CURATOR ANNE PONTEGNIE could not have known that her title for this year’s Printemps de Septembre, “D’un Autre Monde” (From Another World), would resonate so well with the autumnal protests that swept the United States, for which another world is very much at issue—though she might have guessed that, at least for some viewers, the combination of these words and this contemporary arts festival’s titular “springtime” would call to mind last year’s spate of uprisings in the Arab world. But Toulouse is not Cairo, and this was not that kind of springtime. Far from it: Toulouse is a medieval city on the cusp of the Basque Country, and once yearly it is invaded by a small legion of artists whose works occupy two dozen galleries, churches, cinemas, and exhibition spaces. Under the banner of “another world,” Pontegnie hoped to signal a shift in contemporary art away from traditional

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the January 2012 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.