new-york

Sarah Braman, Good Morning (November), 2011, camper chunk, Plexiglas, steel, paint, 109 x 85 x 94 3/4".

Sarah Braman

Mitchell-Innes & Nash | Uptown

Sarah Braman, Good Morning (November), 2011, camper chunk, Plexiglas, steel, paint, 109 x 85 x 94 3/4".

In 1969, Shasta Trailer Industries—then the best-selling mobile-home manufacturer in the United States—introduced a new product: the Loflyte. Sporting better amenities than the classic silver toaster-on-wheels, this leaner, more compact trailer allowed itinerant Americans to take on the country’s mushrooming interstate system in hitherto unheard-of comfort. Now fast-forward forty years: The once-prominent Shasta Industries has collapsed, its innovative vehicles nearly gone from memory. For her first solo show at Mitchell-Innes & Nash, Sarah Braman dissected and transformed a Loflyte model from the 1980s—bathroom, kitchen, bed, and all—turning the nomadic, emblematically American dwelling into something monumental and tomblike.

To be sure, her carving up of dusty mobile domestic space was inspired by many precedents, from John Chamberlain’s crushed automobiles

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