buenos-aires

Sebastián Gordín, Amanece en las trincheras (Dawn Breaks at the Trenches), 2011, diptych, wood, resin, each panel 13 x 33 7/8".

Sebastián Gordín

Ruth Benzacar Galeria de Arte

Sebastián Gordín, Amanece en las trincheras (Dawn Breaks at the Trenches), 2011, diptych, wood, resin, each panel 13 x 33 7/8".

When Sebastián Gordín began constructing miniature stage sets in the late 1980s, his friends nicknamed him “the bricklayer.” Twenty years later, in one of those intellectual upgrades that sometimes occur in the art world, the writer Graciela Speranza defined him as a postindustrial homo faber. Yet Gordín had continued building in the same vein: mini buildings, mini cinemas, mini stage sets made of wood, Plexiglas, and the like. In these setups, the fantastic was ever present: here a futuristic laboratory in which little men could be seen working at computers, there a bunch of children running out of a house aflame, elsewhere a nocturnal landscape in which pale heads bobbed out of dark waters. Gordín’s repertory of images drew from popular culture with an inclination toward the somber: Winsor McCay’s Little Nemo in Slumberland, a child’s fantasy that is often dark and violent, and

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the January 2012 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.