new-york

Enrico Castellani, Superficie nera (Black Surface), 2003, acrylic on canvas, 39 3/8 x 47 1/4".

Enrico Castellani

Haunch of Venison New York

Enrico Castellani, Superficie nera (Black Surface), 2003, acrylic on canvas, 39 3/8 x 47 1/4".

Enrico Castellani is nothing if not consistent. He has followed seemingly without deviation the path he broached in 1959 with his first Superficie nera (Black Surface). He has unswervingly striven to lend an undifferentiated, uninflected monochromatic (or achromatic) canvas something of the spatial richness and luminosity of traditional painting purely through the physical manipulation of the canvas itself—typically inserting nails beneath its surface, so that it protrudes and draws back in complex patterns at times reminiscent of those in the Op paintings of his British contemporary Bridget Riley. But whereas Riley has highlighted the idea that her paintings are rooted in perceptions of nature—on this account her work can be seen as an extreme extension of systemization and depersonalization of ordinary perception in the Post-Impressionism of Seurat—Castellani

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