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Melvin Moti, Eigengrau (The Inner Self in Outer Space), 2011, color photograph, 19 5/8 x 25 5/8".

Melvin Moti

Meyer Riegger | Berlin

Melvin Moti, Eigengrau (The Inner Self in Outer Space), 2011, color photograph, 19 5/8 x 25 5/8".

In a darkened section of the gallery, a film projector cast an image onto the wall: the barren, gray surface of the moon pocked with craters. Looking down as if floating above it, the camera bobs and swivels. Next, the film observes the interaction of floating, gently spinning glass vases, which draw meteoric paths in slow motion. The vases, the carved wooden spoons, and the repoussé gold-leafed eighth-century Thai Buddha seen in the 35-mm film appeared as well in a series of photographs occupying the gallery’s other room. These objects are replicas of works in the collection of the Victoria and Albert Museum in London—or actual pieces identical to ones in the collection in the case of the vases, which were industrially produced in the nineteenth century. And it is that museum’s method of display that Melvin Moti took as the subject of his critique in this exhibition, titled

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