new-york

Walton Ford, On the Island, 2011, watercolor, gouache, ink, and pencil on paper mounted on aluminum panel, 9 x 12'.

Walton Ford

Kasmin Gallery | 293 Tenth Avenue

Walton Ford, On the Island, 2011, watercolor, gouache, ink, and pencil on paper mounted on aluminum panel, 9 x 12'.

Walton Ford made his name in the late 1980s and early ’90s with work that had a political and ecological agenda. From early, folk-art-like paintings of nineteenth-century contacts between white settlers and Native Americans to the work for which he’s best known—large-scale, finely detailed watercolors of animals, derived in style from the prints of the ornithologist John James Audubon and similar naturalist art—Ford found ways to suggest realities hidden by his visual sources. Much as postcolonial scholars have read the novels of Jane Austen, for example, against the slave-trade economy of her time, Ford studied the historical and intellectual context of the seductive art forms he had mastered—not to mention the specific, disturbing behavior of Audubon in particular—to produce pictures that combined the appeal of his models with pointers toward circumstances

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