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Mark Geffriaud, The light that moves against the wind, 2011, blown-glass lenses filled with water, light, paper, shelves. Installation view.

Mark Geffriaud

gb agency

Mark Geffriaud, The light that moves against the wind, 2011, blown-glass lenses filled with water, light, paper, shelves. Installation view.

Mark Geffriaud triggered an explosion of references with the extremely long title of his exhibition, which, in its abbreviated version, reads, “All that is said is true, all the time, all the time . . . on October 26th.” Its opening lines were appropriated from a poem by musician and performance artist Genesis Breyer P-Orridge, to which Geffriaud appended the announcement of the French release date of Marie Losier’s 2011 film about him, The Ballad of Genesis and Lady Jaye, which documents P-Orridge’s and his second wife Lady Jaye’s manipulation of their bodies in order to become a single “pandrogynous” being. This is a decidedly more carnal experiment with doubling and displacement than Geffriaud ventures in his own work. But the urgency of his insistence on encounter and exchange seems equal.

In the gallery’s main room, shrouded to create the effect of a cavernous space, Geffriaud

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