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Sanja Iveković, Sweet Violence, 1974, still from a black-and- white video, 5 minutes 56 seconds.

Sanja Iveković

MoMA - The Museum of Modern Art

Sanja Iveković, Sweet Violence, 1974, still from a black-and- white video, 5 minutes 56 seconds.

Croatian artist Sanja Iveković’s works, which range from private gestures documented on video to public interventions broadcast on television or erected in a city square, were never intended for museum display. Yet for “Sweet Violence,” the artist’s first retrospective in the United States, curator Roxana Marcoci overcame the challenge of presenting such formally diverse works in an institutional context. At once the starting point and the centerpiece of this exhibition, the large-scale Lady Rosa of Luxembourg, 2001, emblematized this success—it actually seemed made to fit MoMA’s atrium. Conceived as an outdoor public monument and dedicated to Rosa Luxemburg, the work responds to a prominent war memorial in the center of the titular city. The gilt effigy of a heavily pregnant goddess Nike is poised atop a soaring pedestal—Iveković’s answer to the slender, idealized,

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