saint-petersburg,-russia

Vladimir Grig, London Calling, Moscow Speaks, 2010–11, acrylic on canvas, LED light, 63 x 70 7/8".

Vladimir Grig

AL Gallery

Vladimir Grig, London Calling, Moscow Speaks, 2010–11, acrylic on canvas, LED light, 63 x 70 7/8".

Today, Russians approach the legacy of the USSR with a growing historical distance and a peculiar sense of introspection. They perceive it in a less conflicted manner than they once did, acknowledging the playfulness of its mass culture while, at the same time, linking its graphic language to social and cultural (rather than political) transformations. A fascination with the Soviet past might also reflect the renewed upsurge of Slavophilism, which encourages Russians to admire their national heroes and to savor the uniqueness of their experience, closing the gap between grim reality and a profound mysticism, quickly resurgent after the fall of Communism.

In his exhibition “Kustrakita over the River”—whose title refers to a famous patriotic song of the Soviet period—Vladimir Grig challenges both nostalgic yearnings for the mythical Russian past and adversarial attitudes

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