rome

Luca Vitone, Natura morta con “Punt e Mes” (Still Life with Punt e Mes), 2012, plastic food, cloth, glasses, plates, Punt e Mes, water. Installation view. From “D’après Giorgio.”

“D’après Giorgio”

Fondazione Giorgio e Isa de Chirico

Luca Vitone, Natura morta con “Punt e Mes” (Still Life with Punt e Mes), 2012, plastic food, cloth, glasses, plates, Punt e Mes, water. Installation view. From “D’après Giorgio.”

Artists’ houses are always intriguing, for there the dichotomy between person and artist, private and public, vision and banality emerges in all its contingency. The Roman apartment where Giorgio de Chirico lived with his wife Isabella from the period following World War II until his death, in 1978, is no exception: The innovative and original charge of his work clashes with the cozy, bourgeois environment of his home. With this in mind, curator/critic Luca Lo Pinto has invited artists from around the world to install work throughout the apartment, provoking once again the subtle and evergreen question of the relationship between art and life.

Some of the works evoke de Chirico’s life and character. After a long and troubled relationship, de Chirico reconciled with his brother Alberto Savinio shortly before the latter’s death in 1952. At the funeral, he took three laurel leaves

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