stockholm

Mads Gamdrup, Noise, 2012, ink-jet print mounted on Diasec, 86 5/8 x 70 7/8". From the series “Noise,” 2008–.

Mads Gamdrup

Christian Larsen

Mads Gamdrup, Noise, 2012, ink-jet print mounted on Diasec, 86 5/8 x 70 7/8". From the series “Noise,” 2008–.

When Goethe attacked Newton in his 1810 Theory of Colors, he launched what he believed would be his life’s greatest work: a defense of the natural purity of white light against the rational mechanics of Newtonian optics. To Goethe, the color spectrum was not contained within each ray of light, as Newton had suggested, but was the result of light’s struggle against darkness as it fell upon objects and obstructions. Color was lumen opacatum, shaded light.

Goethe was wrong, of course. White light is indeed a spectrum, usually divided into six colors, and darkness is neither the enemy of light nor a productive element of color. But his observations laid the groundwork for Schopenhauer, who relocated the sensation of color from external factors (light rays, encountered objects) to the subjective, psychological, and physiological perception of the human eye. This history forms the

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