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Mimmo Jodice, Church of San Marcellino, Naples, ca. 1977, black-and-white photograph, 9 x 14". From “Peripheral Visions: Italian Photography, 1950s–Present.”

“Peripheral Visions: Italian Photography, 1950s–Present”

The Bertha and Karl Leubsdorf Art Gallery at Hunter College

Mimmo Jodice, Church of San Marcellino, Naples, ca. 1977, black-and-white photograph, 9 x 14". From “Peripheral Visions: Italian Photography, 1950s–Present.”

In the half century after World War II, cities across the United States and Europe underwent structural transformations. In America, middle-class whites fled downtowns for the safety and amenities of the suburbs, leaving behind a minority “underclass” to bear the brunt of the shift to a postindustrial economy. In Europe, it was the poor who were pushed to urban fringes (think Parisian banlieues) while central districts became jewel boxes cosseting the wealthy. On both sides of the Atlantic, cities sprawled outward, absorbing once-independent suburbs into larger metropolitan frameworks. “Peripheral Visions” gathers works by photographers who have examined the liminal zones created by these demographic and infrastructural developments in Italy—places neither wealthy nor extremely poor, not quite suburban yet with enough wildness to offset their urban density.

This concise,

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