yokohama

Fuyuko Matsui, Keeping Up the Pureness, 2004, pulverized stone powder on silk, wooden scroll, 11 5/8 x 31 1/4".

Fuyuko Matsui

Yokohama Museum of Art

Fuyuko Matsui, Keeping Up the Pureness, 2004, pulverized stone powder on silk, wooden scroll, 11 5/8 x 31 1/4".

With more than one hundred paintings and drawings, Fuyuko Matsui’s solo exhibition “Becoming Friends with All the Children in the World” demonstrated a unique vision that embraces death and the dissolution of identity as a means of inspiring passion for life. The paintings are mostly done in the traditional Nihonga style, with powdered mineral pigments on silk, and Matsui succeeds in showing that this eclectic genre of painting—which was established in the late nineteenth century and amalgamates various classical Japanese and Chinese techniques while accepting Western models of realistic imitation—can be a vehicle for the expression of contemporary feeling in an age of deep anxiety and distress.

Since her professional debut in 2005 at Gallery Naruyama in Tokyo and her participation in a 2006 group show in Yokohama, Matsui has attracted public attention for what many

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