new-york

Lutz Bacher, The Book of Sand, 2010–12, twenty-five tons of sand, dimensions variable.

Lutz Bacher

Alex Zachary Peter Currie

Lutz Bacher, The Book of Sand, 2010–12, twenty-five tons of sand, dimensions variable.

This March, the Upper East Side belonged to Lutz Bacher. Standout work by the Berkeley, California–based neo-Conceptualist appeared in three exhibitions uptown: In the Whitney Biennial, throughout, in the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s survey “Spies in the House of Art: Photography, Film, and Video,” and in a solo show at Alex Zachary Peter Currie. The pieces presented were mostly new, and struck a different, more subdued chord than much of Bacher’s previous output, neither directly confronting questions of gender, violence, or power, nor foregrounding a punk élan (as in her well-known series “Jokes,” 1987–88, which couples movie stars and other notables with unsavory one-liners). Instead, Bacher exhibited parts of her “cosmological investigation,” a constellation-like project composed of individual elements that together suggest a single mythic figure—the artist herself.

The

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