los-angeles

Alex Hubbard, Eat Your Friends, 2012, video projection, 9 minutes. Installation view.

Alex Hubbard

Hammer Museum

Alex Hubbard, Eat Your Friends, 2012, video projection, 9 minutes. Installation view.

In his 1975 book, Notes on the Cinematographer, Robert Bresson stated, “Nothing [is] more inelegant and ineffective than an art conceived in another art’s form.” However, attempting to account for film’s specificity, Bresson arrived at a set of stylistic guidelines that gave his approach to the medium a texture like no other. Specificity and its loss have similarly animated the course of Alex Hubbard’s work over the past few years, and his videos—which may at first glance seem to be paintings by other means—have come to occupy a more complex position between and across media. This first solo exhibition of the New York–based artist’s work in a US institution made a strong case for his videos as a practice sui generis.

Comprising two vertically oriented digital projections, Eat Your Friends, 2012, and The Border, The Ship, 2010, the exhibition was presented in a black box;

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