new-york

Beryl Korot, Text and Commentary (detail), 1976–77, five-channel black-and-white video (30 minutes), weavings, drawings. Installation View.

Beryl Korot

bitforms gallery

Beryl Korot, Text and Commentary (detail), 1976–77, five-channel black-and-white video (30 minutes), weavings, drawings. Installation View.

Nearly forty years ago, Beryl Korot began a long-term, ongoing affair with three seemingly unrelated media: textile, print, and video. At the time, she was an editor of the seminal Radical Software, a magazine that she cofounded, and was involved with producing some of the first multichannel video installations, such as Dachau, 1974.

In her 1978 essay “Video and the Loom,” Korot notes the homology among television’s interlaced signal, the loom’s systematic encoding of pattern or image into cloth, and the way in which language is printed: All happen line by line. Likening woven elements to linguistic components—individual letters and words—has formed the basis for her art. Poetry, too, has played a prominent role. (Perhaps Guattari was right when he argued that “poetry should be prescribed like vitamins”: “Careful now,” he wrote, “you’d feel better if you took some poetry.”)

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