los-angeles

Delia Brown, Felicity, Victorious, 2011, oil on board, 8 x 12". From the series “Felicity and Caprice,” 2006–12. Angles Gallery.

Delia Brown

Angles Gallery/Country Club at Martha Otero

Delia Brown, Felicity, Victorious, 2011, oil on board, 8 x 12". From the series “Felicity and Caprice,” 2006–12. Angles Gallery.

A Marxist critic would argue that the uniquely unstable position of the artist within the social hierarchy is a central determinant of all that he or she makes, even if it is not explicitly acknowledged in the work, and perhaps especially then. But what if this factor were declared right up front, as it is in the paintings of Delia Brown, which have long treated class jumping and upward and downward mobility as staple themes? From the start of her career, Brown has sought to manifest a dimension of the art economy that tends to remain latent—the point at which relations between people and between things intersect and become conflated. From the outset, she has also approached this territory from two seemingly irreconcilable tangents: one part autobiographical account of the facts of her life inside the art world and one part aspirational fantasy.

Picked up just out of grad

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the Summer 2012 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.