barcelona

Peter Piller, Immer noch Sturm (Still Storming) (detail), 2012, suite of six ink-jet prints, dimensions variable. From the series “Immer noch Sturm” (Still Storming), 2012.

Peter Piller

ProjecteSD

Peter Piller, Immer noch Sturm (Still Storming) (detail), 2012, suite of six ink-jet prints, dimensions variable. From the series “Immer noch Sturm” (Still Storming), 2012.

Storms at sea and waves of history. A long series of photographs of choppy seas and of landscapes devastated by the battles of World War I. It was impossible not to suspect that a secret genealogy lay behind this exhibition showing the sublime and devastating force of nature alongside lands ravaged by the barbarism of man. The Sturm und Drang literary movement is conventionally associated with the notions of freedom of expression, productive genius, and love of nature, but alongside the misadventures of the young Werther, Georg Büchner sensed the consequences of that same unstoppable Drang, portraying the irrational drives that assail human nature as schizophrenia in the case of Lenz (1839) and jealousy in the case of Woyzeck (1837). The compulsion underlying it reappears on the high seas in Ahab’s mad pursuit of Moby-Dick in Herman Melville’s great novel of 1851.

The sorrows of

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