new-york

Peter Saul, Peter Saul vs. Pop Art, 2012, acrylic on canvas, 75 x 72".

Peter Saul

Mary Boone Gallery | Uptown

Peter Saul, Peter Saul vs. Pop Art, 2012, acrylic on canvas, 75 x 72".

Peter Saul’s paintings are clever, witty, ironic—and nasty. In Peter Saul vs. Pop Art, 2012, a grimacing, sweating figure—a representation of the artist himself—uses a chain saw to cut into a can of CAMPBELL’S TOMATO SOUP, clearly a reference to Warhol’s work. In a further act of destruction, Campbell’s is spelled “Cambell,” suggesting the childishness or perhaps faux naïveté of Pop artists; they don’t know how to spell, let alone copy. cambell tomato soup is hand-written—clumsily, even crudely—and the word CONDENSED may acknowledge the cheap artificiality of the soup, not to say the fakeness of Pop art.

Saul’s dislike of canonical painters is self-evident in Raccoons Paint a Picture, 2011. Rendered cartoonishly in red, four of the striped-tailed animals slather multicolored paint on a sickly yellow ground, evoking the old idea that a messy monkey could

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